The police is usually an organized body of people whose task is to enforce the established laws and punish those who violate them.

Ironically, in some countries[1] (for example, Zimbabwe or the United States) the police officers seem to do an exact opposite of that[2] -- violating the law and harassing people who did nothing specifically illegal. The job of a police officer by itself attracts people wishing to abuse the power and gives them many way to do so with relatively little punishment -- for example, attacking the peaceful protesters, murdering others for minor crimes and sometimes for no reason, or even taking money from mobsters. [3]. Jesus Huerta dies of a gun shot wound to the head while his hands were in handcuffs and behind his back. Police insist it was self inflicted but the victim's relatives are doubtful and want answers. [4] PZ Myers is also skeptical if Huerta could really have shot himself in that situation. [5] In the United States, police have the preconceived notion that anything a petty lawbreaker (sometimes a peaceful citizen only being interrogated) holds or takes out of their pocket is a gun, mostly due to the wide availability of rifles and the few laws surrounding them. This seems to be especially true for African-American men. Even if proven in a court of law that the victim shot by cops was unarmed, they will almost always get off scott-free.Liberapedia hopes the police will be made accountable for what looks suspiciously like murder by another person.

Even in the UK, police can get corrupt, [6]

Many Liberals believe that if a group of people is supposed to be dedicated to preserving law and order, this group should be an example of following the law itself; so appropriate regulations should be in place.

See alsoEdit


  1. Police Corruption
  2. Rooting Out Police Corruption
  3. Police Brutality in America
  4. Durham Police Chief: Teen died of gunshot wound to the head
  5. Brown people must be amazingly limber, I guess
  6. Police recorded 8,500 corruption allegations in three years

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